Wednesday, September 28, 2022
Home Tech News Plant-based food brand created ‘human meat’ burgers for a Halloween stunt

Plant-based food brand created ‘human meat’ burgers for a Halloween stunt

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web
browser that
supports HTML5
video

To celebrate Halloween, why not treat yourself to a tasty ‘human meat plant-based burger.’?

Opting for a little casual cannibalism is what Swedish food brand Oumph focused on this October 31.

The company created the ‘human burgers’ and offered them from a food truck in Stockholm as a Halloween stunt.

As for how they know what human flesh is supposed to taste like, the company posted on Instagram that it had ‘spent countless hours researching.’

Oumph has built a business on plant-based alternatives as a way to get people to become more environmentally friendly about the way they eat.

In a promo video for the human burger, chef and Oumph co-founder Ankan Linden said he expected it would evoke curiosity and a little disgust. He said that making people feel uncomfortable was the idea.

Thankfully, the company said the burgers wouldn’t be turned into a regular item on the menu.

In fact, they were discontinued after Halloween because ‘otherwise it would be creepy.’

Well, it does look quite tasty (Oumph)

Halloween stunts aside, the move to plant-based meat alternatives is gaining momentum. Impossible Burgers are one well-known example and use soy leghemoglobin from the roots of soy plants as its key ingredient.

The soy protein gives the burger a realistic ‘meaty’ taste because it’s similar to the proteins found in blood. It’s the first time that soy leghemoglobin will be widely consumed as a food additive.

And, naturally, eating less meat will benefit the environment overall.

Meat production is extremely resource-intensive. In 2018, the UN called animal agriculture ‘the world’s most urgent problem’.

If everyone in the UK swapped just one red meat-based meal to a plant-based one per week, we’d cut the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions by 50 million tonnes.

That data comes from a 2019 study by meat-free food brand Meatless Farm. Admittedly, they’ve got some skin in the game – but that equivalent of taking 16 million cars off the road. Even a fraction of that would be incredible.

So, going vegan can go a long way – and it’s no trouble, with all the delicious vegan recipes out there.


MORE : Eat less meat and don’t fly as much, says Sir Patrick Vallance


MORE : Plan that suggested meat tax to help people go vegan swiftly deleted

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

Former Calgary Dino now a rookie with NFL’s Los Angeles Chargers

Canadian Deane Leonard has certainly taken the path less travelled to the NFL’s Los Angeles Chargers. The 22-year-old cornerback is in his rookie season with...

‘Impact success!’ Nasa spacecraft smashes asteroid in first ever ‘planetary defence test’

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Nasa has successfully crashed a spacecraft into a small asteroid...

TikTok could face £27m fine for failing to protect children’s privacy

TikTok could face £27m fine for failing to protect children’s privacyInvestigation finds video-sharing app may have breached UK data protection law between 2018 and...

Eight states sue crypto lender Nexo over security sales and misleading marketing

/ New York’s attorney general alleges that the company’s Earn Interest Product was a security, one that the company wasn’t registered to sell,...