Tuesday, February 7, 2023
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Oppo Find N2 review

Introduction

The one foldable that’s so unlike the form factor’s norm, the Oppo Find N from late 2021, just got a replacement in the form of the Find N2. A year later, almost to the day, the N2 again defies the standards for dimensions and proportions in the ‘full-size’ phone-turns-tablet space. Let’s see what’s changed.

Most notable, if not necessarily evident, is the reduction in weight – the Find N (1) may have been small, but it was dense and as heavy as the large ones. The new model is now lighter than an iPhone 14 Pro Max. Minuscule differences in the dimensions are mostly immaterial, but what’s ultimately important is that the Find N2 is a nicely compact phone with a sensible aspect ratio when folded, and a landscape-ish small tablet when unfolded – you can’t get that elsewhere.

Another significant development is in the camera system. By necessity, not quite state-of-the-art in this respect, foldables typically make size-driven compromises, and the Find N had a rather meh setup with no AF on the ultrawide and a fairly basic tele cam. The Find N2 elevates that to more of an ‘okay’ status on paper, bringing larger sensors to the ultrawide and the tele, and adding AF on the former. It’s no ‘cameraphone’ still, but definitely a step up.

The N2 also gets a chipset update, as usual, but it’s the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 and not the Gen 2 – another year when the foldable Find will be out of lockstep with the flagships of the day. A couple of charging developments round up the list of ‘major’ changes this year – a welcome move from 33W to 67W charging, countered by an unfortunate but understandable scrapping of the wireless charging coil (thinness and lightness were a higher priority).

Oppo Find N2 specs at a glance:

  • Body: 132.2×140.5×7.4mm, 233g; Glass front (Gorilla Glass Victus), glass back (Gorilla Glass Victus) or eco leather back, aluminum frame.
  • Display: 7.1″ Foldable LTPO AMOLED, 120Hz, HDR10+, 1200 nits (HBM), 1550 nits (peak), 1792x1920px resolution, 8.4:9 aspect ratio, 370ppi; Cover display:, AMOLED, 120Hz, Corning Gorilla Glass Victus, 5.54 inches, 1080 x 2120 pixels, 18:9 ratio, 1000 nits (HBM), 1350 nits (peak).
  • Chipset: Qualcomm SM8475 Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 (4 nm): Octa-core (1×3.0 GHz Cortex-X2 & 3×2.75 GHz Cortex-A710 & 4×2.0 GHz Cortex-A510); Adreno 730.
  • Memory: 256GB 12GB RAM, 512GB 16GB RAM; UFS 3.1.
  • OS/Software: Android 13, ColorOS 13.
  • Rear camera: Wide (main): 50 MP, f/1.8, 24mm, 1/1.56″, 1.0µm, multi-directional PDAF, OIS; Ultra wide angle: 48 MP, f/2.2, 14mm, 115˚, 1/2″, 0.8µm, AF; Telephoto: 32 MP, f/2.0, 47mm, 1/2.74″, 0.8µm, 2x optical zoom, PDAF.
  • Front camera: Cover: 32 MP, f/2.4, 22mm, 1/3.14″; Internal: 32 MP, f/2.4, 22mm, 1/3.14″.
  • Video capture: Rear camera: 4K@30/60fps, 1080p@30/60/240fps, gyro-EIS, HDR; Front camera: 1080p@30fps, gyro-EIS.
  • Battery: 4520mAh; 67W wired, 10W reverse wired.
  • Misc: Fingerprint reader (side-mounted); stereo speakers (Dolby support); stylus support.

What hasn’t changed and what the specsheet isn’t going to tell you is that the Find N2 will remain exclusive to its home market. The Find N2 Flip is as close as you can get to an Oppo foldable outside of China (maybe).

Oppo Find N2 unboxing

The Find N2 ships in a similar box to the one from the previous generation – it’s the same kinetic design where opening the lid lifts the phone compartment towards you. It’s not all black this time – the top is painted light bluish gray. And even though the handset may have shrunk in size and lost weight, its package has actually grown in all three directions – totaling a 30% increase in volume. Hmm. For what it’s worth, however, there’s more in it too.

Oppo Find N2 review

The charger is beefier – in specs, at least, if not so much in physical size (67W vs. 33W). A cable is also included (USB-A-to-C).

But there’s a case this time around, an accessory that was missing on the Find N. It’s a two-piece design with the frame-like display portion being heavily reliant on adhesive strips (though it still stays on without applying them), while the half that covers the back is a snap-on-only type. The back is covered in faux leather in a greenish hue to go with the phone’s own color scheme.

Another nice touch for this generation is the included microfiber cloth. It’s worth pennies, sure, but it’s the gesture that counts.

Design, build quality, handling

Oppo got something right from the get-go that the other makers of large foldables don’t seem to have figured out yet – the form factor. The original Find N from a year ago was a small, yet perfectly usable smartphone when folded, and transformed into a compact tablet in a squarish aspect, but leaning towards landscape orientation. It was a unique approach then, and nothing has changed now with the Find N2.

Oppo Find N2 review

The Find N2 iterates on the concept of its predecessor and treats you to a 5.54″ display on the outside that’s perfect for general single-handed operation, calls, and other tasks that don’t require a lot of screen estate. Oppo likes to compare the experience on the Find N2’s outer screen to the Galaxy Z Fold4, and, indeed, the Find’s proportions make so much more sense.

Oppo Find N2 review

At 6.2 inches in diagonal, the Galaxy’s cover display may sound like the better option because it should give you more room to work with. But the Fold’s elongated aspect (23.1:9 this year) means that the 12% longer diagonal only translates to 5% more area, and that’s only secondary to the fact that a display as narrow as the Galaxy’s hampers keyboard use – and this reviewer will be first to admit that texting is how he spends the bulk of his smartphone use. In this aspect, the Find N2 is an easy winner.

Oppo Find N2 review

A point can be made that other large foldables aren’t as narrow as the Fold and give you an even better platform for texting – like the Mix Fold 2 or even the entirely conceptually different Huawei Mate Xs 2. But those are way taller (and, by extension, ultimately a lot larger) than the Find N2.

So in the realm of ‘large’ foldables, the Find N2 remains the most compact one physically, without really sacrificing usability in its smartphone state – on the contrary, it’s even arguably better than the ‘benchmark’ Galaxy Z Fold4.

Oppo Find N2 review

Admittedly, we’ve only been talking about the footprint, essentially, and for all its compactness in two of the dimensions, the Find N2 remains sort of a tiny chonker if you were to compare it to a conventional bar smartphone. But at 14.6mm around the waistline, it’s substantially thicker than some foldables too, like the Mix Fold 2 or the Mate Xs 2 (both just over 11mm). And that’s after Oppo managed to reduce the thickness from the previous generation’s 15.9mm.

Oppo Find N2 review

A comparison against the Fold4, on the other hand, does make the Find N2 look a lot better. The Galaxy’s folded thickness varies between 14.2 and 15.8mm and the Find is in the lower end of that range. Plus, it folds onto itself without any visible gap between the two halves, an ever-present eyesore on the Samsung foldables.

Oppo Find N2 review

But size is only half of the pocketability story. The other aspect is weight, and the Find N2 easily wins here. Oppo says the new model is 42g lighter than the original, and that’s quite the feat. The numbers require some explanation though, and to get there, we need to talk materials and color options first.

Oppo Find N2 review

The Find N2 is available in three colorways, and the White and Green ones have Gorilla Glass Victus backs and those versions are specified to weigh 237g. The Black one comes with an eco-leather rear panel, which makes it 4g lighter at 233g, and that’s what the press materials base the 42g weight reduction on.

The Oppo Find N2 is thinner, lighter and has better screens, the Find N2 Flip 

There’s another small caveat in that these numbers typically don’t include screen protectors on either display, and while you could remove the plastic sheet from the outer one, the inner panel wouldn’t be too happy to receive that treatment. Point being that our glass-backed Green review version tips our scales (admittedly not one bit standardized or calibrated) at 242g.

But that’s not half bad, really. Our Fold4 review unit shows 268g on the same scales, so the Find is still lighter by a tangible margin. And when you consider that (on paper) an iPhone 14 Pro Max is 240g and the Galaxy S22 Ultra is 228g, with the Find you’re getting a phone and a tablet in essentially as much weight as a large phone.

Going from phone to tablet is a pleasing and trouble-free operation – a notable step up from the previous generation. You could attempt to do it single-handedly, but it neither looks nor feels right, and you’ll need help from the left hand – use both hands, to begin with, please.

The now flat frame gives plenty of gripping area, and you can open the thing without even wedging your fingertips between the two halves – something you can absolutely do as well, thanks to the frame’s chamfered edges.

Oppo Find N2 review

The weight of the springs in the hinge is such that it doesn’t feel like the phone is fighting you – it complies while providing just the right amount of resistance. It’s also designed to stay at any arbitrary in-between angles in the 45-to-125 degree range, enabling use cases like a ‘tripod’ mode for self-shooting from a table or waist-level photography with the viewfinder parallel to the ground.

Oppo Find N2 review

Oppo will tell you that they’ve brought the number of parts inside the hinge to 100 – 38 down from the previous design, which has partly contributed to the weight reduction. This second-generation Flexion hinge uses carbon fiber and aviation-grade alloys and has been rated to 400,000 actuations.

The hinge design is also instrumental in providing the no-gap closed state of the Find N2 – yet another foldable that achieves something Samsung’s been refusing to do for one reason or another. The display forms a droplet shape inside the body, which allows it to survive the process.

Oppo Find N2 review

When unfolded, the Find N2 manages to maintain an almost creaseless surface along the center line. We can’t help but wonder, however, if the original Find N did it that one extra bit better. In any case, even this arguably slightly less flat Find N2 is smoother and flatter than virtually any rival.

Find N (top left) next to Find N2 - Oppo Find N2 review
Galaxy Z Fold4 (top left) next to Find N2 - Oppo Find N2 review

Find N (top left) next to Find N2 • Galaxy Z Fold4 (top left) next to Find N2

In this state, you’re getting a nice tiny 7.1-inch tablet with a squarish aspect ratio – more or less the same aspect ratio as the other large foldables. But the differences here are two-fold. For one, the Find N2 unfolds into a landscape orientation – squarish as it may be, it’s still wider than it is tall. You could argue that with the other foldables, you can simply rotate and have a landscape orientation, but on the Find, you end up there naturally, with one fewer action.

Oppo Find N2 review

And the other thing is, once again, weight. The Find N2 is simply lighter and more comfortable for longer use than any of the other potential competitors. It’s small enough to almost make it look odd when held with both hands.

Oppo Find N2 review

It’s not all roses on the Find N2, however. One of the unexpected changes coming from the previous generation is the relocation of the volume rocker from the ‘front’ half to the back one when thinking of it as a smartphone and from the left to the right when in tablet configuration. One use case where we found this detrimental was for double pressing the volume rocker to launch the camera – it’s nowhere as convenient as it was on the Find N(1).

The fingerprint reader, embedded in the power button and placed in more or less the same location as before, remains a fast and reliable solution for unlocking.

Oppo Find N2 review

The other not so great bit about the Find N2, and possibly the only hardware area where it trails the Galaxy Z Fold4 that we’ve been mentioning over and over again, is the ingress protection. The last two generations of Galaxies are the only foldables with a true IPX8 rating, and the Find N2 isn’t joining them. Sure, it has a gasket around the SIM card tray (dual nano, no microSD, as expected), and it will probably survive a splash or a few drops of rain (don’t quote us on that), but it’s not water-resistant.

Oppo Find N2 review

Brighter 7.1-inch display inside, 5.54 inches on the cover

The Find N2 is hiding a 7.1-inch LTPO AMOLED display inside itself, revealing it all once unfolded. It’s quite similarly specced to the one on the previous generation, with the same diagonal and 1,792×1,920px resolution (in a 8.4:9 aspect ratio) making for a 370ppi pixel density. The 120Hz maximum refresh rate remains unchanged too, but Oppo promises increased brightness numbers.

Oppo Find N2 review

On the cover, you’re looking at a 5.54-inch AMOLED with a 1,080×2,120px resolution and an 18:9 aspect ratio. This is a new panel, compared to the Find N’s and in addition to the higher resolution and marginally larger diagonal, you’re also getting 120Hz refresh rate support – the old one was limited to a rather disappointing 60Hz. This one should be brighter than before too.

Oppo Find N2 review

Both displays feature a touch sampling rate of up to 480Hz. HDR10+ compliance is also on the specheet (no Dolby Vision, though).

In our brightness testing we measured an impressive 1216nits on the large display when in Adaptive brightness mode and with the phone tablet under bright light. Oppo’s numbers are 1550nits for ‘outdoor’ brightness and 1200nits for HDR purposes, so it could be that our testing software isn’t able to trigger the ‘correct’ mode. In any case, 1216nits is a lot – 200 and change on top of the Galaxy Z Fold4’s result. The maximum brightness we got when adjusting the slider manually was 502nits – a more or less standard performance.

Display test 100% brightness
Black,cd/m2 White,cd/m2 Contrast ratio
Oppo Find N2 0 502
Oppo Find N2 (Max Auto) 0 1216
Oppo Find N 0 490
Oppo Find N (Max Auto) 0 582
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4 0 505
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4 (Extra Brightness) 0 809
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4 (Max Auto) 0 1000
Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 0 522
Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 (Max Auto) 0 1054
Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded) 0 506
Huawei Mate X2 0 469
Huawei Mate X2 (Max Auto) 0 542
Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra 0 494
Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (Extra brightness) 0 829
Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (Max Auto) 0 1266
Apple iPhone 14 Pro Max 0 828
Apple iPhone 14 Pro Max (Max Auto) 0 1760

The cover display was ‘only’ good for 967nits when placed under bright light in Adaptive brightness mode – here the Fold4 does score a marginal victory, mostly good for bragging rights. The Mix Fold 2 is about as bright as the Oppo, while the Huaweis aren’t nearly as great. Also the Find N2 is some 200nits brighter than the N(1). The manually attainable 487nits are also par for the course, as was on the internal display.

Display test 100% brightness
Black,cd/m2 White,cd/m2 Contrast ratio
Oppo Find N2 (Cover display) 0 487
Oppo Find N2 (Cover display, Max Auto) 0 967
Oppo Find N Cover 0 505
Oppo Find N Cover (Max Auto) 0 785
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4 (Cover display) 0 486
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4 (Cover display, Extra Brightness) 0 802
Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4 (Cover display, Max Auto) 0 1034
Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 (Cover Display) 0 501
Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 (Cover Display, Max Auto) 0 940
Huawei Mate Xs 2 0 514
Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Max Auto) 0 725
Huawei Mate X2 (cover display) 0 472
Huawei Mate X2 (cover display, Max Auto) 0 601
Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra 0 494
Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (Extra brightness) 0 829
Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (Max Auto) 0 1266
Apple iPhone 14 Pro Max 0 828
Apple iPhone 14 Pro Max (Max Auto) 0 1760

The Find N2 has a total of 4 color modes, the default being Vivid. It’s not the vivid-est one, though – there’s also Brilliant, which takes things a step further. Both of these modes are okay-ishly accurate for DCI-P3 targets, but they’re notably cold in the whites. The supplementary color temperature slider can correct for that.

There’s an easier option, however. The other two modes, Natural and Cinematic, are excellently tuned for sRGB and DCI-P3 content respectively, returning average dE2000 values of around 1 and neutral whites.

Oppo Find N2 review

The refresh rate menu gives you two options – Standard and High. It’s the same setting for both screens, so you can’t set it independently on the two. Standard limits things to 60Hz, while High allows the refresh rate to reach the 120Hz maximum. Technically, the internal screen should be able to dynamically adjust the refresh rate all the way down to 1Hz. The cover panel isn’t as sophisticated and Oppo doesn’t advertise its minimum refresh rate, so we reckon it’s a standard 60Hz.

In practice, Android only reports 120Hz and 60Hz modes while the phone is in use with the ‘Show refresh rate’ utility turned on in Developer options, while the Display.Mode class lists an additional 90Hz mode. There’s also the matter that the Android refresh rate reporting ended up being at odds with our tool that reads the fps from the renderer and there were instances where we got 120Hz from android but 60fps from our tool. That’s not new, it’s another layer of uncertainty when it comes to refresh rate.

In any case, when the Find N2 is in High mode, it will drop its refresh rate after it detects a few seconds of no touch input – likely to 60Hz, but possibly lower – we can’t be sure. Video apps will tend to default to 60Hz as soon as you launch them (so no smooth scrolling in YouTube), and there’s no high refresh rate for games – a persisting limitation across ColorOS devices.

Oppo Find N2 battery life

The Find N2 is powered by a 4,520mAh battery – an immaterial 20mAh increase in capacity over the previous generation. It’s more or less the standard capacity for the segment – the Z Fold4 has a 4,400mAh powerpack, while the Mix Fold 2 and the Mate Xs 2 stand at 4,600mAh.

In our testing, the Find N2 showed improvements in all the ‘active’ tests, but failed to match the original model’s standby efficiency, ultimately leading to a lower overall Endurance rating of 83h.

It’s the actual use that matters more, we reckon, and the Find N2’s 17:18h result (at a constant 60Hz) is over 3h better than on the Find N(1). The 13:33h on our Wi-Fi web browsing script (at a constant 120Hz) is another increase, to the tune of 15%. Of a similar magnitude is the improvement in voice calls, now at 27:34h.

Oppo Find N2 review

Our battery tests were automated thanks to SmartViser, using its viSerDevice app. The endurance rating denotes how long the battery charge will last you if you use the device for an hour of telephony, web browsing, and video playback daily. More details can be found here.

The Find N2’s results, particularly with the screen on are significantly better than competitors like the Mix Fold 2 or the Mate Xs 2. Even the Galaxy Z Fold4 is trailing in video playback (14:26h), though it does have a minor advantage in web browsing (14:02h).

Video test carried out in 60Hz refresh rate mode whenever possible. Web browsing test done at the display’s highest refresh rate whenever possible. Refer to the respective reviews for specifics. To adjust the endurance rating formula to match your own usage – check out our all-time battery test results chart.

Repeating the screen-on tests on the cover display of the Find N2, we got essentially the same results as on the Find N (17:08h and 17:41h).

Oppo Find N2 review

Charging speed

The Find N2 improves on the N(1)’s 33W charging capability and doubles the rating to 67W. A charger that matches that rating is bundled too.

Oppo Find N2 review

We clocked a zero to 100% time of 37 minutes on the Find N2 and we were looking at 87% at the half-hour mark (49% in 15 minutes). These aren’t record-breaking results in absolute terms, but the Find N2 is just about the fastest-charging large foldable we’ve tested.

30min charging test (from 0%)

Higher is better

Sort by

Name

30 min time

Oppo Find X5 Pro

91%

Oppo Find N2

87%

Huawei Mate Xs 2

85%

Huawei Mate X2

80%

Xiaomi Mix Fold 2

77%

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (25W)

61%

Oppo Find N

57%

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4

50%

Apple iPhone 14 Pro Max

48%

* Tap/hover over the device names for more info

Time to full charge (from 0%)

Lower is better

Sort by

Name

Time

Oppo Find X5 Pro

0:40h

Oppo Find N2

0:41h

Huawei Mate Xs 2

0:43h

Xiaomi Mix Fold 2

0:45h

Huawei Mate X2

0:58h

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (25W)

1:04h

Oppo Find N

1:05h

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4

1:19h

Apple iPhone 14 Pro Max

1:52h

* Tap/hover over the device names for more info

The push for thinness and lower weight has sadly resulted in the Find N2 losing the wireless charging capability that the Find N had. Oh, well.

Speaker test

The Find N2 has a dual speaker setup where both units are on the bottom – same as the previous generation. That does get you a stereo effect when you’re using it in tablet mode, but when it’s folded the separation is lost. Additionally, the ‘opposite’ speaker will be playing back the same sound that’s meant for the other channel, albeit at a much lower volume.

Oppo Find N2 review

Both speakers are on the bottom

The Find N2 just managed to inch its way into the ‘Good’ category for loudness in our test, a notch above the ‘Average’ Find N, if by just a small margin. The Mate Xs 2 is the only recent large foldable that earned a ‘Very Good’ rating for loudness.

The Find N2’s sound quality is a step up from the Find N, offering slightly livelier treble response and that extra little bit of low-end presence. We’d say it sounds a little better overall than the Galaxy Z Fold4 but not as full as the Mate Xs 2. The Mix Fold 2 is perhaps the least bass-y of the bunch.

Use the Playback controls to listen to the phone sample recordings (best use headphones). We measure the average loudness of the speakers in LUFS. A lower absolute value means a louder sound. A look at the frequency response chart will tell you how far off the ideal “0db” flat line is the reproduction of the bass, treble, and mid frequencies. You can add more phones to compare how they differ. The scores and ratings are not comparable with our older loudspeaker test. Learn more about how we test here.

Android and ColorOS, both v.13

Our Find N2 review unit arrived running Android 13 with ColorOS 13 on top, albeit in a China-specific flavor. It’s a welcome development given that the Find N last year had a by-then dated Android 11, even if there was ColorOS 12 over it. (A side note – our Find N is still on Android 11.)

Oppo Find N2 review

We’ve seen a few Realmes with ColorOS 13 and Android 13, so we’ve already encountered some of the cosmetic changes. As for the tablet-specific bits in the Oppo overlay, the Find N2 may be the first of its kind that we experience, though the original one and other ColorOS tablets did have pretty extensive multitasking functionality already. The continuity between the two screens is obviously unique to the foldables, though.

Oppo Find N2 review

Let’s try and cover the multitasking first – that’s probably key if you’re eyeing a foldable. A gesture introduced on the old Find N is one of the easiest ways to go into split-screen mode – just swipe down from the top with two fingers and the app you’re currently in will move to the left, revealing the homescreen underneath for you to pick another app for the right half.

A new three-dot bar on top of each window gives you options to expand the app to fullscreen, replace it with one of three auto-selected recently used apps, or open the homescreen for the full selection.

The three-dot menu on the borer between the two apps allows you to resize the two apps (albeit within a very very tight margin) and save the pair to a shortcut on the homescreen.

There’s also a new, third option – you can now have the apps split horizontally. It’s a most welcome development for certain use cases – one colleague insists its absence on the Find N was a dealbreaker. Tha may continue to be case for him, however, as the horizontal split appears to only work on in-house apps, and not even all of them (not even the browser).

Cutting the screen - Oppo Find N2 review
Pick a second app - Oppo Find N2 review
Split screen - Oppo Find N2 review

Split screen top menu - Oppo Find N2 review
Split screen options - Oppo Find N2 review
Horizontal split - Oppo Find N2 review

Cutting the screen • Pick a second app • Split screen • Split screen options • Horizontal split

You can also go into split screen from the task switcher, which is also one of methods for opening an app into a floating window. Another means for getting a floating window is by pinching to zoom out from a fullscreen app using 4 or 5 fingers. These other two options require you to have the app already running, but you can also launch an app straight into a floating window – that happens from the Smart sidebar. If you have an app running in a floating window on top of a fullscreen app, you can grab the floating window’s handle and drag it to either side edge of the screen, which will take you into split screen once again.

Some of these gestures come intuitively, others need some deliberate learning, but once you get used to all the possibilities, it should be smooth sailing.

Floating window from the Task switcher - Oppo Find N2 review
Smart sidebar - Oppo Find N2 review
Floating window to split screen - Oppo Find N2 review

Floating window from the Task switcher • Smart sidebar • Floating window to split screen

There’s also the FlexForm mode, which enables a certain change in interface in supported apps where the ‘consumption’ portion is in the top half, while the ‘interaction’ is on the bottom. It kicks in automatically if you fold the Find mid-way when you’re on the homescreen, in which case it will offer app suggestions that can utilize this mode. Alternatively, if you’re already in a supported app, it will engage when you fold the screen halfway. It worked in some in-house apps and YouTube, for example.

FlexForm - Oppo Find N2 review
FlexForm - Oppo Find N2 review
FlexForm - Oppo Find N2 review

FlexForm

Perhaps the most useful implementation for this FlexForm is for the camera app. In one use case, you can have the phone folded at 90 degrees for waist level shooting with the camera app UI and the viewfinder on the half of the screen that remains parallel to the ground. Alternatively, you can have the viewfinder in the top half, but the UI on the bottom. Lastly, you can have the camera app display large thumbnails of pictures already taken right next to the live viewfinder.

FlexForm for the camera app - Oppo Find N2 review
FlexForm for the camera app - Oppo Find N2 review
FlexForm for the camera app - Oppo Find N2 review

FlexForm for the camera app

Some of the apps you normally use may not be tailored for the relatively unusual aspect ratio of the Find N. It will therefore default to a pillarboxed view for third-party apps and display them in a 16:9 aspect. Tapping on the ‘expand’ button will restart the app in fullscreen mode. You can decide in setting how you want each app to be displayed.

Additionally, you can set the Find’s default behavior upon folding it – whether it should go to standby, straight up continue on the outer screen, or give you a couple of seconds to confirm you want to continue with a swipe, otherwise it will go to standby.

Display size settings - Oppo Find N2 review
Pillarboxed app - Oppo Find N2 review
Screen switching setting - Oppo Find N2 review

Display size settings • Pillarboxed app • Screen switching setting

For the ColorOS 13 basics, let’s move to the outer screen. The launcher has no-nonsense homescreens, a simplistic and clean notification/toggles area, and an easy-to-use task switcher. An optional app drawer is available too, and it is as clutter-free as one could hope for.

ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review

ColorOS 13

The new launcher adds support for Large Folders and Dynamic Widgets. Any folder can be enlarged or shrunk and you can directly launch apps in the large folders, no need to open the folder first. There is also an expanded Search page with dynamic widgets – to the left of the leftmost homescreen.

Small folder - Oppo Find N2 review
Large folder - Oppo Find N2 review
Widgets - Oppo Find N2 review

Small folder • Large folder • Widgets

There are many powerful tools within the settings menu if you want full control over your Find N2. The features are wide-ranging but generally carried over from previous ColorOS versions. A host of screen-on and screen off gestures are available, the Smart Sidebar is a handy pane of shortcuts you pull from the side, in-house gallery and file management apps are available.

More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review

More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review
More ColorOS 13 - Oppo Find N2 review

More ColorOS 13

Performance and benchmarks

The Find N2 is powered by the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 chipset. In a way, that’s a year behind the latest, having in mind that handsets are now coming out with the Gen 2 and that’s what’s going to be in flagships for the next year. On the other hand, the Find N2 arrives a year after the N (1) and has a chipset that’s a year newer – the Find N was also a little bit behind the times. It’s like the Find N2 is going to be lacking in power, it’s more that the SD 8 Gen 2 comes with certain efficiency benefits that the Oppo foldable will be missing out on.

Oppo Find N2 review

The iQOO 11, the only SD 8 Gen 2 handset we’ve benchmarked, has a clear advantage over the Find N2 in GeekBench and Antutu – 30-40% higher scores for the newer chipset and that is what you could expect from the next Galaxy Z Fold too. The Find is a bit behind the current Fold4 already, however, in both single-core and multi-core GeekBench, though the two are neck and neck in Antutu. The Mix Fold 2 outscores them comfortably.

GeekBench 5 (single-core)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    1479
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    1374
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    1337
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    1180
  • Oppo Find N2
    1057
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    1002
  • Oppo Find N
    985
  • Huawei Mate X2
    956
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    884

GeekBench 5 (multi-core)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    4803
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    4368
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    3981
  • Oppo Find N2
    3670
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    3657
  • Oppo Find N
    3478
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    3433
  • Huawei Mate X2
    3389
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    3131

AnTuTu 9

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    1281665
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    1050139
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    1012896
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    968359
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    964530
  • Oppo Find N2
    962082
  • Oppo Find N
    822513
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    641608

In onscreen graphics on the large display, the Find N2 is keeping up pretty well in fps numbers in GFXBench thanks to a slightly lower resolution than the Galaxy and the Mix, while the Mates are both resolution and chipset to fall further behind. Then there’s the matter that Find is capped at 60Hz/60fps though, so it ends up trailing in less demanding tests where the others can roam free above that threshold.

GFX Aztek ES 3.1 High (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    54
  • Oppo Find N2
    49
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    43
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    40
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    35
  • Oppo Find N
    32
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    30
  • Huawei Mate X2
    20
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    19

GFX Aztek Vulkan High (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    55
  • Oppo Find N2
    52
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    42
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    41
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    36
  • Oppo Find N
    33
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    29
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    21
  • Huawei Mate X2
    12

GFX Car Chase ES 3.1 (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    67
  • Oppo Find N2
    59
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    59
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    52
  • Oppo Find N
    51
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    44
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    37
  • Huawei Mate X2
    29
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    28

GFX Manhattan ES 3.1 (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    112
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    93
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    93
  • Oppo Find N2
    60
  • Oppo Find N
    60
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    58
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    45
  • Huawei Mate X2
    40

If for whatever reason you plan on playing games on the cover screen of the Find N2, you can expect sort of a middle of the road flagship performance, if that makes any sense. Even more so here than on the internal display, you’ll be constrained by ColorOS’ 60fps limitation – the Find N2 hits that and that’s it.

GFX Aztek ES 3.1 High (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Galaxy Z Fold4 (cover display)
    78
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 (cover display)
    62
  • Oppo Find N2 (cover display)
    59
  • iQOO 11
    54
  • Oppo Find N (cover display)
    50
  • Huawei Mate X2 (cover display)
    36
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2
    34
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    30

GFX Aztek Vulkan High (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Galaxy Z Fold4 (cover display)
    72
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 (cover display)
    62
  • Oppo Find N2 (cover display)
    60
  • iQOO 11
    55
  • Oppo Find N (cover display)
    45
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2
    34
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    29
  • Huawei Mate X2 (cover display)
    19

GFX Car Chase ES 3.1 (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Galaxy Z Fold4 (cover display)
    98
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 (cover display)
    80
  • iQOO 11
    67
  • Oppo Find N2 (cover display)
    60
  • Oppo Find N (cover display)
    60
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2
    51
  • Huawei Mate X2 (cover display)
    46
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    37

GFX Manhattan ES 3.1 (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 (cover display)
    120
  • iQOO 11
    112
  • Galaxy Z Fold4 (cover display)
    109
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2
    78
  • Oppo Find N2 (cover display)
    60
  • Oppo Find N (cover display)
    60
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    58
  • Huawei Mate X2 (cover display)
    47

If we look at the offscreen graphics benchmarks, the Find N2 is proving quite the perfomer, inching ahead of the 2022 foldable crowd, though obviously it’s no match for the 2023 Snapdragon.

GFX Aztek ES 3.1 High (offscreen 1440p)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    62
  • Oppo Find N2
    46
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    45
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    45
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    40
  • Oppo Find N
    31
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    31
  • Huawei Mate X2
    29
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    28

GFX Aztek Vulkan High (offscreen 1440p)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    69
  • Oppo Find N2
    51
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    50
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    50
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    44
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    35
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    31
  • Huawei Mate X2
    31
  • Oppo Find N
    30

GFX Car Chase ES 3.1 (offscreen 1080p)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    128
  • Oppo Find N2
    104
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    102
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    101
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    94
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    76
  • Oppo Find N
    73
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    72
  • Huawei Mate X2
    61

GFX Manhattan ES 3.1 (offscreen 1080p)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    222
  • Oppo Find N2
    180
  • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2
    178
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    174
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    162
  • Oppo Find N
    125
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    121
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    109
  • Huawei Mate X2
    100

3DMark Wild Life Vulkan 1.1 (offscreen 1440p)

Higher is better

  • iQOO 11
    12738
  • Oppo Find N2
    10517
  • Galaxy Z Fold4
    10382
  • Oppo Find X5 Pro
    9758
  • Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    7437
  • Oppo Find N
    5928
  • Huawei Mate Xs 2 (Unfolded)
    5830
  • Huawei Mate X2
    5693

To sum up the charts – the Find N2 is plenty powerful. It scores as high or higher than the 2022 foldable crowd, but will be left behind once SD 8 Gen 2 foldables inevitably start coming out. Then again, with a SD 8+ Gen 1 and 16GB of RAM on our review unit, there was never a moment where the phone/tablet kept us waiting.

Several updates on the back, sort of same selfies

Foldables in general don’t come with industry-leading camera hardware and the original Find N followed that norm of having simply okay modules. The second generation is in a similar state, but let’s just say that the new setup is okay-er.

Oppo Find N2 review

The improvements can be seen on the telephoto, and perhaps even more so on the ultrawide. The zoom camera is still at 2x, but now has a larger 1/2.74″ sensor (up from 1/3.4″). It’s a 32MP Sony IMX709 sensor with an RGBW color filter which still does 4-to-1 pixel binning and outputs 8MP images. It a sense, it’s somewhat of a downgrade from the 13MP tele camera of the Find N then, particularly for daylight shooting, and as we’ll see later, this camera isn’t used at night all too often.

Anyway, moving on to the ultrawide. It now gets a Sony IMX581 Quad Bayer sensor with a large 1/2.0″ optical format and 0.8µm pixels. The lens has a quoted 14mm equivalent focal length and an f/2.2 aperture, but perhaps the most important development here is having AF which lets you do closeups and adds versatility in framing and subject matter.

The main camera is based on a Sony 1/1.56″ sensor, Quad Bayer again, with 1.0µm pixels. The promo materials say it’s an IMX890, which the internet knows little about, while hardware apps report IMX766, which is the same as the Find N’s. Either way, you’ll be getting 12.5MP images by default. The stabilized lens has a 24mm equivalent focal length and an f/1.8 aperture.

There are a couple of identical selfie cameras, each cutting a hole in one of the displays. Oddly enough, while still 32MP in resolution, they’re no longer the Sony-based units from the Find N, but Samsung-sourced ones. The JD1 Tetrapixel sensor has a 1/3.14″ optical format and 0.7µm pixels and it’s placed behind a fixed-focus 22mm-equivalent f/2.4 lens. All of that, times two.

Oppo Find N2 review

The ongoing Oppo-Hasselblad collaboration makes it to the Find series this year and should mean that the Swedish camera company has pitched in with some color science and whatnot. Meanwhile, the in-house-developed Marisilicon X imaging NPU is in charge of processing the data streams, particularly for HDR and low-light video.

Oppo Find N2 review

The Hasselblad influence can also be more readily seen in the viewfinder of the camera app, where the historically yellow ColorOS accent has turned orange. Other than that, the app is not much different than what you’ll find on any Oppo or Realme (or OnePlus, for that matter).

Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review
Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review
Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review
Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review
Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review

Camera UI

That is, before you get to the foldable aspects of its operation, which is where all the fun of having a Find N2 is. There are two almost invisible shortcuts around the upper left corner of the full-blown UI. The first one, with the two arrows, minimizes the camera viewfinder to one part of the screen, while the other half allows you to scroll, view and edit your recently shot images. This way, the camera stays ready if another cool moment worth capturing comes around.

The other one shows a preview on the cover screen – this way, your friends will see themselves while you are taking photos of them. And if you hit the same key on the cover screen while in this mode, you will be able to use it as a primary viewfinder and take selfies with the rear cameras.

Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review
Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review
Camera UI - Oppo Find N2 review

Camera UI

And before we close this chapter, we want to point out that you can use the Flex mode (the halfway opened position) for tripod purposes. If it’s not windy, it’s a great way to take timelapses and group photos with you in them.

Daylight photo quality

The Find N2’s main camera captures excellent daylight photos. You can count on accurate white balance and pleasing color saturation as well as consistently good exposure and wide dynamic range. Sharpness is also great, detail is rendered with a reasonable amount of processing and there’s no noise to speak of.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/1774s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 106, 1/2922s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/1380s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 104, 1/2483s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/764s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/1552s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 787, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 214, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 520, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 292, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1312, 1/33s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/507s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, main camera (1x)

Enabling the AI scene enhancement toggle didn’t appear to make much of a difference, even in scenes where the viewfinder would indicate a ‘Blue sky’ scene, for example, where we’d normally expect extra saturation in the blues.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/1840s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 103, 1/2922s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/1342s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/2614s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/741s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/1552s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 811, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on - f/1.8, ISO 224, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), AI scene enhancement on

The 50MP Hi-res mode returned unremarkable 50MP images. It’s one of those instances when we’d say they look as if they’ve been upscaled from the 12.5MP ones, rather than being demosaicked differently from the sensor.

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/1840s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 103, 1/2922s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/1380s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/2614s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/730s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 102, 1/1552s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 822, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP - f/1.8, ISO 274, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, main camera (1x), 50MP

In daylight the new telephoto camera is sort of a side step from the old one. It brings a substantial improvement in noise performance – these shots are notably cleaner than the Find N’s. However, the 8MP vs 12MP drop in resolution, coupled with the marginally wider coverage, means you’re getting less per-pixel detail and the 2x shots are now overall less crispy. Contrast is on point, but white balance was off on occasion.

Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 101, 1/1105s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 101, 1/2354s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 101, 1/999s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 102, 1/1972s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 100, 1/593s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 101, 1/986s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 1200, 1/52s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, telephoto camera (2x)

The new ultrawide is more of an overall upgrade than the tele. The reduction in noise can be seen here as well, but we’re also getting significantly improved sharpness and detail, even despite another decrease in the resolution (12MP vs. 16MP). The new lens is also less prone to purple fringing than the old one. Color rendition is likeable, if a little bit warmer and more saturated than on the main camera when shooting outdoors. Dynamic range is very good, eeven in these pretty demanding high-contrast winter conditions.

Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 114, 1/794s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 114, 1/794s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/604s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/704s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/350s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/320s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 1280, 1/35s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 1280, 1/42s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 400, 1/65s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 244, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 1280, 1/41s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/231s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, ultrawide camera

Much like on the main camera, the ultrawide’s nominal resolution 48MP images have a distinctly upscaled look, making them largely pointless.

Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 114, 1/794s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 114, 1/794s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 112, 1/551s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/704s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/350s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 113, 1/329s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 1280, 1/35s - Oppo Find N2 review
Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP - f/2.2, ISO 1280, 1/41s - Oppo Find N2 review

Daylight samples, ultrawide camera, 48MP

Low-light photo quality

In low light, the Find N2 expectedly does some sort of heavy Night mode processing in Photo mode, which you cannot turn off. It’s been getting a little murky what is and what isn’t Night mode recently, and there’s a particularly insignificant difference on the Find N2’s main camera, both in experience and end results.

Either way, you’d be getting excellent exposure and nicely wide dynamic range – you can count on well developed shadows and contained highlights. It’s all executed in a very measured way too, so the images don’t jump at you with an overly dramatic ‘classic’ Night mode aesthetic.

Sharpness and detail are excellent. There’s some noise, in the mix as well, but we’d much rather have that than noise reduction smoothing out textures.

Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1546, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1553, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1479, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 2106, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1598, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1928, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1829, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1578, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1533, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1901, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1986, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x) - f/1.8, ISO 1901, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, main camera (1x)

Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1546, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1575, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1414, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 2106, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1598, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1928, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1777, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1554, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1510, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1845, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1986, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1928, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, main camera (1x), Night mode

Zooming in, you can expect the Find N2 to use its main camera in darker scenes for shooting at 2x, whether it’s in Photo or Night mode. Better-lit scenes will be taken care of by the actual telephoto camera (samples 5 and 7 below). Again, there’s next next to no difference which mode you shoot in.

It’s worth pointing out that that behavior came as a result of a firmware update that arrived mid-review. Previously, the phone would more consistently use its telephoto camera for the 2x zoom level in Photo mode regardless of light levels, resulting in generally superior shots than the main-camera-sourced Night mode counterparts. Now, you’re getting the upscaled and heavily sharpened, yet ultimately soft look of digital zoom. Still, at fit to screen magnifications, these maintain the great global properties of the main camera’s output, so it’s not all bad.

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1488, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1353, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1747, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1986, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 2431, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1750, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/2.0, ISO 2782, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1408, 1/21s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 1957, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x) - f/1.8, ISO 2182, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x)

And here come the largely identical Night mode counterparts.

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1488, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1353, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1672, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 2045, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/2.0, ISO 2467, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1442, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/2.0, ISO 2864, 1/25s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1360, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 1957, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode - f/1.8, ISO 2087, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, telephoto camera (2x), Night mode

Moving to the ultrawide, it’s a bit more of the same in that there’s virtually no difference between Photo mode and Night mode images. What’s better is that these are some really good images.

Exposures are on point – no excessive brightening, but still solid detail in the shadows and well controlled highlights. A trace of that higher saturation and warmth that we observed during the day is also present at night, but ultimately color reproduction and saturation don’t give us reasons to complain.

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 4864, 1/7s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 2984, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 4448, 1/9s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 6080, 1/7s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 5504, 1/12s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 5312, 1/11s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 4480, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 5760, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 4928, 1/13s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 5440, 1/10s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x) - f/2.2, ISO 5632, 1/11s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x)

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 4864, 1/7s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 2984, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 4544, 1/9s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 6624, 1/8s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 5472, 1/12s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 5312, 1/11s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 4608, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 5664, 1/17s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 4832, 1/13s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 5024, 1/9s - Oppo Find N2 review
Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode - f/2.2, ISO 5696, 1/11s - Oppo Find N2 review

Low-light samples, ultrawide camera (0.6x), Night mode

Once you’re done with the real world samples, head over to our Photo compare tool to see how the Oppo Find N2 stacks up against the competition.

Photo Compare Tool
Photo Compare Tool
Photo Compare Tool

Oppo Find N2 against the Galaxy Z Fold4 and the Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 in our Photo compare tool

Portrait mode

Portrait mode on the Find N2 can be used with either the main camera at 1x or the telephoto at 2x zoom. The main camera will net you generally slightly higher pixel-level quality, and will deal better with difficult lighting. The telephoto, conversely, means more flattering facial proportions and a more comfortable shooting distance.

Regardless of zoom level, subject detection is competent and the blur level is conservative, making for overall very convincing results.

Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 255, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 404, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 104, 1/2473s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 101, 1/573s - Oppo Find N2 review

Portrait mode samples (1x)

Portrait mode samples (2x) - f/4.5, ISO 538, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (2x) - f/4.5, ISO 1200, 1/77s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (2x) - f/4.5, ISO 100, 1/1280s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (2x) - f/4.5, ISO 100, 1/247s - Oppo Find N2 review

Portrait mode samples (2x)

At 1x, you can also get selfie portraits with the rear camera.

Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 103, 1/1943s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 100, 1/167s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 100, 1/117s - Oppo Find N2 review
Portrait mode samples (1x) - f/2.8, ISO 400, 1/59s - Oppo Find N2 review

Portrait mode samples (1x), selfies

Selfies

And it’s not just for portraits – rear camera selfies are a much better idea on the Find than the other ones. They are generally higher quality than any ‘true’ selfie camera can give you so here it’s mostly usability considerations that get in the way. Like the fact that with the Find N2 unfolded, the viewfinder is way away from the actual camera that’s taking the picture, so you need to remind yourself to look at the lenses, rather than the live preview.

Additionally, while a fully functional interface can be shown on the outer screen for these use cases, it can be quite the challenge to hold the now-tablet and press the shutter release, all with just one hand – palm shutter is an option though, and that helps greatly.

Oppo Find N2 review

Here are some selfie samples taken with the main camera on the back of the Find N2.

Selfie samples, main rear camera - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/115s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, main rear camera - f/1.8, ISO 400, 1/59s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, main rear camera - f/1.8, ISO 101, 1/1840s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, main rear camera - f/1.8, ISO 100, 1/174s - Oppo Find N2 review

Selfie samples, main rear camera

Another principal difference from almost any other conventional phone is that the foldable form factor enables using the ultrawide camera for selfies – be it for whacky compositions, getting more people in the frame, or showing more context. It also helps that the ultrawide camera of the Find N2 has autofocus (particularly for odd perspective selfie closeups).

The ultrawide’s warmer colors show up in skintones too.

Selfie samples, ultrawide rear camera - f/2.2, ISO 230, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, ultrawide rear camera - f/2.2, ISO 846, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, ultrawide rear camera - f/2.2, ISO 114, 1/869s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, ultrawide rear camera - f/2.2, ISO 187, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review

Selfie samples, ultrawide rear camera

Then there are the selfie cameras that are in the displays. Given the option to use the rear cameras for taking pictures of your mug, we reckon that the dedicated selfie cameras should only be relegated to video calls or when you can’t be bothered to do the gymnastics to enable the rear screen preview – either way image quality clearly isn’t paramount.

These aren’t strictly bad, it’s just that the alternative is thoroughly better. Also, the selfie-selfie images come out at the nominal 32MP resolution and that’s only good for inflating file sizes – they most certainly don’t have 32MP of detail in them and they have a rather soft overall look.

Selfie samples, inner selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 200, 1/78s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, inner selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 800, 1/44s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, inner selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 100, 1/676s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, inner selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 163, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review

Selfie samples, inner selfie camera

Selfie samples, cover selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 200, 1/80s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, cover selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 800, 1/43s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, cover selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 100, 1/533s - Oppo Find N2 review
Selfie samples, cover selfie camera - f/2.4, ISO 191, 1/100s - Oppo Find N2 review

Selfie samples, cover selfie camera

Closeups

The Find N2 has this toggle in the viewfinder’s quick settings that enables an ‘Auto macro’ mode. The way it works is when you’re at 1x in the viewfinder and you move in too close to a subject for the main camera to be able to focus, the phone will switch to a zoomed in view from the ultrawide (which can focus a lot closer), with a coverage to match the 1x zoom level. There’s no dedicated macro mode for you to ‘force’ on the phone – only this ‘Auto’ implementation, which you can disable if you don’t want the Find to be changing cameras on you.

All in all, the closeups are pretty solid, even despite their upscaled nature.

Closeup samples - f/2.2, ISO 1280, 1/46s - Oppo Find N2 review
Closeup samples - f/2.2, ISO 400, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Closeup samples - f/2.2, ISO 227, 1/50s - Oppo Find N2 review
Closeup samples - f/2.2, ISO 1484, 1/20s - Oppo Find N2 review

Closeup samples

Video recording

The Find N2 records video up to 4K60 with the main and ultrawide cameras. The telephoto itself maxes out at 1080p30, though you could also shoot at up to 4K60 at the 2x zoom level, only the footage will come from the main camera.

By default the phone uses the h.264 codec, but you can switch that to the more efficient h.265. 4K30 clips from either camera got a bit rate between 44 and 61Mbps in our experience, while 4K60 was more consistently around 62Mbps. Audio is recorded in stereo at 256kbps.

Main camera footage is solid, but not flawless. Dynamic range is wide, and color saturation is on point, but white balance was off in our experience and footage was all too warm and yellowish. Somewhat disconcerting was the difference in sharpness between 30fps and 60fps footage – 30fps was good, but 60fps was better.

There was no such detail discrepancy on the ultrawide, where both modes returned equally sharp (and that’s very sharp) results. On the flipside, these had different dynamic range, with the 30fps looking notably better at the tonal extremes. The needlessly warm color reproduction continues, however.

If anything, the telephoto is closer to neutral, though it may be overcompensating and erring on the cool side. That’s not much of a victory, though, because to get the actual telephoto to record video, you need to be in 1080p30 and we’re all about that 4K. Additionally, the 2x clips from the tele camera suffer from relatively limited dynamic range. Detail is very good as 1080p goes, for what it’s worth.

There’s electronic stabilization in all video modes, and it works wonderfully on both the main and the ultrawide camera. Shake from walking is ironed out, pans have no jerky transitions, footage is super stable when just pointing the phone in one direction.

The telephoto is very stable too, but that’s not making it any more 4K.

Low-light video quality on the Find N2 is relatively good. You do get some highlight clipping, but dynamic range is reasonably wide and there’s little haloing around light sources. Shadows are somewhat noisy, but they do retain some detail. Color saturation is good too.

The ultrawide is a bit excessive with its colors but that’s one better than desaturation, we reckon. The overly enthusiastic exposure does boost noise making it fairly obvious, but again, at least it’s not all just a gloomy darkness.

The telephoto returns usable footage, particularly in terms of color and dynamic range. Detail is more of a vague concept, but it’s not the worst we’ve seen.

Here’s a glimpse of how the Oppo Find N2 compares to rivals in our Video compare tool. Head over there for the complete picture.

Video Compare Tool
Video Compare Tool
Video Compare Tool

Oppo Find N2 against the Galaxy Z Fold4 and the Xiaomi Mix Fold 2 in our Video compare tool

Competition

For us living outside of China, the Oppo Find N2 will forever remain elusive – unless, that is, one is willing to go through the hoops of gray-importing one and then living with a firmware that is not meant for ‘international’ customers. But there are international foldables, so to speak.

Oppo Find N2 review

The Galaxy Z Fold4 is the obvious top option and you can have one pretty much anywhere in the world. It’s the clunkiest of form factors, however, and has the most tangible crease in its display, though it does counter with an IPX8 rating for water-resistance – no competing foldable offers that. Then there’s OneUI, which possibly makes the best use of the tablet state with tons of features and versatility that the Find can’t quite match. The Oppo does fit into smaller pockets though, has a much more usable cover screen, and the landscape tablet implementation just feels more organic. The Find is also the better looking device – the Galaxy’s wedge shape when folded will never cease to be an eyesore.

Oppo Find N2 reviewGalaxy Z Fold4 (left) next to the Find N2

The Huawei Mate Xs 2 is also available outside of China and it too has a unique spin on the phone-turns-tablet design – being an outie it only has the single flexible display on the outside. It poses durability concerns, though, with what is essentially an always exposed plastic display. And despite its international status, the Huawei foldable is missing Google services, which you can get on the otherwise Chinese Find N2. Conversely, though, from a Chinese perspective that’s not an issue.

Moving on then to the Mix Fold 2, another large foldable that’s not leaving its home market. It’s one of the sexiest designs in the business, and perhaps you can forgive its lack of stability in intermediate semi-unfolded states. The Oppo is perhaps a slightly better cameraphone, though you could say the Mix has the upper hand in multitasking. Again, though, only of these can be called compact.

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4
Huawei Mate Xs 2
Xiaomi Mix Fold 2

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold4 • Huawei Mate Xs 2 • Xiaomi Mix Fold 2

That said, if pocketability is key, perhaps you could reassess your form factor choices and opt for one of the clamshell-descendant designs. Oppo makes one of those too now, and the Find N2 Flip will even see a global release (sometime, maybe). There’s always the IPX8-rated Galaxy Z Flip4, and the Motorola Razr 2022 is strong on nostalgia vibes. The Huawei P50 Pocket isn’t half bad either, with one of the more curious camera setups – on a foldable or otherwise.

Oppo Find N2 Flip
Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4
Motorola Razr 2022
Huawei P50 Pocket

Oppo Find N2 Flip • Samsung Galaxy Z Flip4 • Motorola Razr 2022 • Huawei P50 Pocket

Verdict

We’re not quite in a position to recommend a Find N2 or advise against one, seeing how market specifics don’t really present us with a choice. What we can say is that the second generation Oppo foldable maintains all that set the original one apart and made it a unique offering and build on that, resulting in an overall superior product.

The displays retain the size and proportions of the Find N – possibly the best package for the most people, only now they get a brightness boost and extra smoothness on the cover. The phone’s gotten appreciably lighter, has better cameras and performance and the speedy charging couldn’t hurt.

Oppo Find N2 review

A couple of tough decisions had to be made to reach the lightness goals and the wireless charging fell victim, which is a bummer. The relocation of the volume rocker gives us pause as does the speaker arrangement, but that’s mostly nitpicking.

Ultimately, the one dealbreaking issue for us is not an issue with the phone itself – it’s the fact that we can’t really have one, not officially, and not with the software we’re used to using. Let’s keep our fingers crossed then that the Find N3 will finally make it out of China.

Pros

  • Most compact foldable of its kind, lightest too.
  • Thoroughly great displays, unusual aspect ratios better than the alternatives.
  • Fastest charging large foldable.
  • ColorOS 13 improves on multitasking, is very feature-rich to begin with.
  • Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 is still plenty powerful.
  • Excellent all-round camera experience, great photo quality.

Cons

  • China-only release, once again.
  • No official IP rating (though it’s admittedly only the Galaxies that have that).
  • No wireless charging.
  • Speaker placement could have been better, same story with the relocated volume rocker.
  • Somewhat iffy video recording.
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