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Google Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Introduction

The Pixel 7 and the Pixel 7 Pro are Google’s flagship phones for 2022. Announced somewhat unconventionally five months ahead of launch, the phones are finally going on sale today in many more locations around the world than previous Pixel launches.

The Pixel 7 series can be seen as a small evolutionary step over the Pixel 6 series, which was a major step forward for the Pixel brand. With the Pixel 7, Google is content with making smaller improvements across the board to further refine the Pixel 6 formula into something with an even broader appeal. If that sounds familiar then yes, that has pretty much been the mantra for all major smartphone brands this year, and Google is no exception.

What we are getting on the Pixel 7 series is an update to the new second-generation Google Tensor G2 chipset, which enables a lot of the new software features that center around the camera. The new chip and the software features form the bulk of changes to the Pixel 7, with a slightly updated design and camera hardware rounding up the rest.

It’s not an exciting launch for sure, especially for existing Pixel 6 owners. But it doesn’t need to. What it needs to be is a good set of phones and whether it is that is what we are here to find out.

Design

Both Pixel 7 phones have a revised design for 2022, although it will take you a second to notice the difference. Most of the changes are on the back; gone is the two-tone finish of the Pixel 6 and replaced with a single color. The blacked-out camera bar with a glass cover has been replaced by an aluminum band, with cutouts for the camera lenses.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

These changes don’t necessarily strike us as improvements as the previous design had more personality to it. It is likely more practical, though, as the reduced glass area on the camera cover should make it more durable and less prone to lens flares.

The larger Pixel 7 Pro has a glossy aluminum frame, which flows seamlessly into the camera band. The Gorilla Glass Victus on the front has gentle curves on the sides, which makes it look suitably premium. What isn’t premium, however, is the sizable cutout for the front camera and the slightly thick bezels all around the display. There are phones out there now, especially in this price range, that do both of those things in a less intrusive way.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

The buttons on the side of the phone are in the usual inverted layout for Pixel phones. They are both the same color, as the unique accented power button was dropped last year with the Pixel 6 series. The buttons on the Pixel 7 Pro are oddly stiff. Sure, you can’t press them accidentally but it’s also hard to press them intentionally sometimes. They are also difficult to access when holding the phone in landscape mode.

The Pixel 7 Pro is a large phone but the slim body with curved edges and grippy sides and back makes it relatively easy to use singlehanded. The weight is also manageable and the phone doesn’t feel too heavy for its size.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

The smaller Pixel 7 feels noticeably downmarket in comparison. While it uses the same premium Gorilla Glass Victus on the front and aluminum frame, the way it is designed and finished leaves a lot to be desired.

The Pixel 7 has noticeably chunky bezels all around, which looks especially bad on the black model. Google says it has made the bezels smaller this year but it doesn’t seem to have made any noticeable improvement. The camera cutout, while the same size as on the Pixel 7 Pro, is even more distracting on the smaller display.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

The aluminum frame, which has a zirconia-blasted matte finish, has oddly sharp edges all around, particularly next to the display and the camera bar. The edges constantly rub against your thumbs when you use gestures and even while just holding the phone. The buttons on the side are somehow even stiffer and harder to press than those on the Pixel 7 Pro.

The Pixel 7 is also oddly heavy for a phone of its size. The weight is very close to that of the Pixel 7 Pro but while the bigger phone spreads it across a larger area, the Pixel 7 feels dense and chunky in hand. That said, the smaller Pixel 7 is definitely easier to use singlehanded and the flat display has its advantages.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Both phones have an IP68 dust and water resistance rating. Both come in three colors each, with Snow and Obsidian being common for both. The Pixel 7 Pro also comes in Hazel while the Pixel 7 comes in Lemongrass.

Display

The Pixel 7 Pro has the same display as last year’s model, a 6.7-inch, 3120×1440 LTPO OLED panel with refresh rates that go up to 120Hz. The Pixel 7 has a new 6.3-inch, 2400×1800 90Hz OLED panel that is slightly smaller than the 6.4-inch panel on the Pixel 6.

Both phones have really good display quality with good color calibration. The smaller Pixel 7 looks very sharp and the 90Hz refresh rate feels adequately smooth for everyday use. The display also gets bright enough to view comfortably outdoors. Just make sure you have auto brightness enabled as the manual brightness does not get bright enough outdoors.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

The Pixel 7 Pro display is outstanding. Aside from having a super smooth 120Hz refresh rate and QHD resolution, the display also gets extremely bright outdoors, which makes it very easy to see even under direct sunlight.

Indoors, however, the auto brightness can be very conservative on both phones and needs to be manually bumped up every so often. The Pixel 7 Pro also comes set to FHD resolution instead of QHD out of the box, so users will need to change that manually when they first get their device if they want to experience the maximum image clarity that the panel is capable of.

Google is very lenient with its refresh rate adjustment, so you tend to get the maximum refresh rate of the display on both phones in most situations. This is unlike other manufacturers, who will often lock certain apps to 60Hz for some ungodly reason. The only apps that are locked to 60Hz on these phones are Camera and Maps.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Both phones also support HDR10, HDR10+, and HLG standards for watching HDR content, but there’s no Dolby Vision support. The HDR performance is good, especially on the Pixel 7 Pro, which can get much brighter. Neither display can output the full 10-bit color of HDR content, however, and use dithering to map it to their 8-bit panels.

Both Pixel 7 phones also include an optical fingerprint sensor built into the display. The sensor was fast and reliable during our testing and didn’t give us any reason to complain. There is also an always-on display mode available but this puts a sizable dent in the battery life and isn’t recommended if you plan on getting through a long day away from the charger.

Audio

Both the Pixel 7 and the Pixel 7 Pro have stereo speakers, one placed discreetly inside the earpiece grille and the other at the bottom of the phone.

The stereo speakers on the Pixel 7 Pro sound really good, with rich vocals and decent bass response at medium to high volumes. The speakers also get very loud but there is some distortion at higher levels. The sound is also a bit imbalanced, with the bottom speaker sounding louder. Also, since the earpiece speaker fires out of a thin slit, the sound is very focused and directional, and minor adjustments to the angle of the phone can change how the speaker sounds.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

The speakers on the Pixel 7 are much less impressive. Audio quality is nowhere near as good as the Pixel 7 Pro and the speakers sound fairly tinny in comparison. They also don’t get as loud. The stereo imbalance is even more pronounced here, although oddly it’s the earpiece speaker that’s louder on the Pixel 7.

As you’d expect, there is no headphone jack on either of the two phones nor are there any audio accessories provided in the box. As with previous Pixel phones, neither of the Pixel 7 phones supports analog USB audio adapters, which forces you to use a USB DAC if you want to use wired headphones with them.

Software

The Pixel 7 and the Pixel 7 Pro come with Android 13 out of the box. Being Google’s own phones, you can expect the version of Android here to be unskinned, and that’s exactly what you get.

Android 13 doesn’t bring any groundbreaking new features and if you are coming from Android 12 you really need to go through with a fine-tooth comb to spot any notable differences. However, this being a Pixel phone, you do get a few extra features added on top that you won’t on other Android phones.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

A lot of the Pixel-exclusive features are centered around the camera. This includes things like Real Tone, which captures different skin tones more authentically even in challenging lighting conditions, Photo Unblur, which removes blur from newly captured or even existing photos, and Guided Frame, which helps those with low vision frame their shots using audio and haptics.

Other features include Live Translate, for real-time translations in 48 languages, Clear Calling to filter out your caller’s background noise and enhance their voice, and a VPN service powered by Google One, which will be coming later in select regions.

Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Android 13 Pixel UI - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Android 13 Pixel UI

Google also has the Pixel Feature Drop, which adds new software features every few months through software updates. Speaking of updates, the Pixel 7 devices will receive three years of major OS updates and at least five years of security updates.

The overall software experience on the Pixel 7 devices is clean and intuitive. However, those coming over from other Android manufacturers may notice that Google’s version of Android isn’t as feature-rich as you may be used to. Some of this can be compensated for by installing apps but if you crave a large amount of customizability and features then the Pixel phones may not be for you.

Performance

The Pixel 7 and the Pixel 7 Pro are the first Google devices to be powered by the company’s own Tensor G2 chip. Based on the same 5nm process as the original Tensor, the new chip features an octa-core CPU with faster ARM Cortex cores and higher clock speeds, as well as an updated Mali GPU. Google also claims upgraded image processing capabilities, more advanced speech recognition, and improved efficiency.

The real-world performance of both devices is exceptional. The Pixel 7 Pro, in particular, with its high refresh rate display, feels exceedingly fast and responsive. The animations are lightning quick and apps open even before your finger is out of the way after tapping the icon. The only odd bit of stutter was on the Pixel 7 Pro when unlocking from the lockscreen, and this could be replicated every time, so it seems more like a bug.

Synthetic benchmark performance was underwhelming. We couldn’t quite get a read on the CPU performance as the phones wouldn’t run our Geekbench tests but the GPU scores are within testing variance compared to the original Tensor. We did see an improvement in compound benchmarks like Antutu, which suggests there is some improvement in CPU performance, as most other aspects have remained the same.

We did a bit of gaming as well on the Pixel 7 phones. Testing Genshin Impact at maximum settings, the Tensor G2 struggled to maintain a consistent 60fps throughout, requiring dropping down image quality settings. If you are into playing a lot of demanding games, these may not be the phones for you, although they will do just fine for less challenging titles.

Neither phone gets particularly hot while playing but the smaller Pixel 7 does get noticeably warmer.

AnTuTu 9

Higher is better

  • Motorola Edge 30 Ultra
    1074722
  • Xiaomi 12T Pro
    1032185
  • Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    968359
  • OnePlus 10 Pro
    886248
  • Samsung Galaxy S22
    881428
  • Sony Xperia 1 IV
    838832
  • Sony Xperia 5 IV
    835038
  • Google Pixel 7
    813114
  • Google Pixel 7 Pro
    796369
  • Google Pixel 6 Pro
    719815
  • Google Pixel 6a
    712092
  • Google Pixel 6
    676831

GFX Aztek ES 3.1 High (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Motorola Edge 30 Ultra
    65
  • Samsung Galaxy S22
    53
  • Xiaomi 12T Pro
    50
  • Google Pixel 7
    49
  • Sony Xperia 5 IV
    48
  • Google Pixel 6a
    47
  • Google Pixel 6
    46
  • Sony Xperia 1 IV
    43
  • OnePlus 10 Pro
    37
  • Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    30
  • Google Pixel 6 Pro
    28
  • Google Pixel 7 Pro
    26

GFX Aztek ES 3.1 High (offscreen 1440p)

Higher is better

  • Xiaomi 12T Pro
    45
  • Motorola Edge 30 Ultra
    43
  • OnePlus 10 Pro
    43
  • Google Pixel 7
    31
  • Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    31
  • Google Pixel 6 Pro
    31
  • Samsung Galaxy S22
    31
  • Google Pixel 6
    30
  • Google Pixel 7 Pro
    29
  • Google Pixel 6a
    29
  • Sony Xperia 5 IV
    29
  • Sony Xperia 1 IV
    26

GFX Aztek Vulkan High (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Motorola Edge 30 Ultra
    62
  • Xiaomi 12T Pro
    58
  • Sony Xperia 5 IV
    55
  • Google Pixel 7
    46
  • Samsung Galaxy S22
    44
  • Google Pixel 6
    43
  • OnePlus 10 Pro
    41
  • Google Pixel 6a
    39
  • Sony Xperia 1 IV
    31
  • Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    29
  • Google Pixel 6 Pro
    26
  • Google Pixel 7 Pro
    25

GFX Aztek Vulkan High (offscreen 1440p)

Higher is better

  • Xiaomi 12T Pro
    50
  • OnePlus 10 Pro
    48
  • Motorola Edge 30 Ultra
    43
  • Sony Xperia 5 IV
    38
  • Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    35
  • Google Pixel 6a
    32
  • Google Pixel 7
    31
  • Google Pixel 7 Pro
    30
  • Google Pixel 6 Pro
    30
  • Google Pixel 6
    30
  • Samsung Galaxy S22
    29
  • Sony Xperia 1 IV
    26

GFX Car Chase ES 3.1 (onscreen)

Higher is better

  • Sony Xperia 1 IV
    74
  • Motorola Edge 30 Ultra
    73
  • Samsung Galaxy S22
    69
  • Xiaomi 12T Pro
    65
  • Sony Xperia 5 IV
    63
  • Google Pixel 7
    59
  • Google Pixel 6
    57
  • Google Pixel 6a
    51
  • OnePlus 10 Pro
    48
  • Google Pixel 6 Pro
    39
  • Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    37
  • Google Pixel 7 Pro
    34

GFX Car Chase ES 3.1 (offscreen 1080p)

Higher is better

  • Xiaomi 12T Pro
    100
  • OnePlus 10 Pro
    97
  • Motorola Edge 30 Ultra
    93
  • Sony Xperia 1 IV
    79
  • Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra (1440p)
    76
  • Samsung Galaxy S22
    74
  • Google Pixel 6 Pro
    70
  • Sony Xperia 5 IV
    70
  • Google Pixel 7
    66
  • Google Pixel 6
    66
  • Google Pixel 6a
    66
  • Google Pixel 7 Pro
    63

Camera

The Pixel 7 Pro has a triple camera system while the smaller Pixel 7 has dual cameras at the back. Both phones share the main 50MP f1.85 camera that has been borrowed from the Pixel 6 phones, as well as the new 12MP f2.2 ultra-wide camera, which even has autofocus on the 7 Pro.

The Pixel 7 Pro also has a new 48MP f3.5 telephoto camera with 5x magnification over the main camera. Combining optics and Google’s Super Res Zoom image processing, the Pixel 7 Pro can achieve 30x magnification whereas the Pixel 7 is limited to 8x.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Both phones also have laser autofocus, spectral and flicker sensor, and OIS and EIS on the wide and telephoto cameras.

The camera app is a simple affair, with the zoom toggle below the viewfinder as well as the mode switcher. Swiping down on the screen brings a few quick toggles for Night sight, Top Shot, Timer, and more. From there, you can also access the full settings.

Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Camera app - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Camera app

As with previous Pixel phones, Google’s Camera app is not loaded with a lot of options or modes. Notably, there is no pro mode, although you can still optionally save images in DNG RAW format. These are processed RAWs, similar to Apple’s ProRAW, except Google has been doing these since the Pixel 3 days.

Moving on to the image quality, the Pixel 7 main camera delivers results that are consistent with what we have come to expect from Pixel cameras.

Starting with the main 50MP camera, the Pixel 7 phones deliver sharp, detailed images with low noise. Images have the typical Pixel look, with aggressive texture and clarity enhancement, and prominent tone mapping. The colors tend to mostly be realistic, with the usual blue/magenta bias in daylight shots. It’s remarkable how consistent the overall image processing looks even going as far back as the original Pixel phone and it’s clear Google has decided not to mess with its winning formula.

Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 40, 1/2179s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 46, 1/4184s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 47, 1/1217s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 46, 1/4525s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 47, 1/2571s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 41, 1/1825s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 46, 1/6667s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 46, 1/1451s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Main camera - f/1.9, ISO 46, 1/237s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Main camera

The 2x mode works by cropping on the main camera on both phones and provides pretty good results with a much more pleasing focal length, although the processing can be a bit aggressive at times.

2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 40, 1/935s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 51, 1/4525s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 49, 1/1134s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 48, 1/3906s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 50, 1/2632s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 46, 1/951s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 45, 1/5376s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 41, 1/745s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x digital zoom - f/1.9, ISO 338, 1/1898s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

2x digital zoom

The 12MP ultra-wide camera has nearly identical image processing as the main camera and results are very similar, save for the distortion around the edges and the generally softer image due to a wider field of view and low native sensor resolution.

Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 48, 1/2114s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 51, 1/3096s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 46, 1/894s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 47, 1/3876s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 48, 1/2326s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 48, 1/3876s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 49, 1/7752s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 44, 1/1106s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Ultra-wide camera - f/2.2, ISO 47, 1/2160s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Ultra-wide camera

The new 5x telephoto on the Pixel 7 Pro is a bit of an odd man out. The image processing is not consistent with the other two cameras, producing softer, less aggressively processed, and notably warmer/greener images every time. The images are still detailed and the image processing is arguably much more natural and realistic but it does not blend well with the other two cameras.

5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 31, 1/316s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 16, 1/61s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 17, 1/96s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 18, 1/206s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 16, 1/376s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 17, 1/84s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 19, 1/240s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 260, 1/1348s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x telephoto camera - f/3.5, ISO 16, 1/162s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

5x telephoto camera

The new trick up the Pixel’s sleeve is the updated digital zoom processing. Using a revamped version of the Super Res Zoom feature, the Pixel 7 Pro can produce some remarkable results. 2x and 3x zoom on the main camera produce very usable results. At 5x and beyond the camera switches to the dedicated telephoto camera. 8x, 10x, and even 15x produce very good results using the telephoto. The Pixel 7 Pro maxes out at 30x, which doesn’t look great but is much better than what you’d imagine.

0.5x - f/2.2, ISO 48, 1/1721s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
1x - f/1.9, ISO 49, 1/2513s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x - f/1.9, ISO 60, 1/2571s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

3x - f/1.9, ISO 57, 1/2513s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x - f/3.5, ISO 26, 1/273s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
8x - f/3.5, ISO 25, 1/284s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

10x - f/3.5, ISO 23, 1/277s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
15x - f/3.5, ISO 18, 1/243s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
30x - f/3.5, ISO 17, 1/127s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

0.5x • 1x • 2x • 3x • 5x • 8x • 10x • 15x • 30x

The smaller Pixel 7 does not have a telephoto camera, so all zooming beyond 1x is done digitally. 2x and 3x are again quite usable. 5x is about as high as one would want to go and even that doesn’t look great. The camera maxes out at 8x, which is quite blurry.

0.5x - f/2.2, ISO 50, 1/2119s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
1x - f/1.9, ISO 52, 1/3058s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
2x - f/1.9, ISO 60, 1/2817s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

3x - f/1.9, ISO 58, 1/2710s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
5x - f/1.9, ISO 63, 1/2710s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
8x - f/1.9, ISO 62, 1/2618s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

0.5x • 1x • 2x • 3x • 5x • 8x

The Pixel 7 Pro also has a new macro mode, which engages automatically when close to your subject. It uses the new ultra-wide camera and can produce good results, at least when it manages to focus, which was an issue during our testing.

Macro mode - f/2.2, ISO 48, 1/207s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review
Macro mode - f/2.2, ISO 48, 1/3096s - Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

Macro mode

Finally, there’s the video capture. All three cameras on the Pixel 7 Pro (and two on the Pixel 7) support recording in 4K up to 60fps. While 4K supports all features, changing from the default 30fps to 60fps will disable some features like HDR and speech enhancement.

Videos from all three cameras had good color reproduction and detail in them. However, there was a noticeable amount of noise in the shadows on the main and especially the ultra-wide cameras which could get quite distracting when watching on a large 4K display.

The phone also has four different image stabilization modes. The standard mode is the one used for all samples here and is designed for everyday use. Locked mode does a 2x crop and locks on to a far-away subject. Active uses the ultra-wide camera for more aggressive stabilization. And finally, Cinematic Pan makes it easy to shoot smooth panning shots and saves the video in 2x slow motion without audio.

Conclusion

Our full conclusion on the new Google Pixel 7 devices will have to wait for the full review. As for our initial impressions, we thought the larger Pixel 7 Pro performed quite well in our short period of testing. It has an impressive display, great performance, a great set of cameras, and a clean Pixel software experience.

Pixel 7 and 7 Pro hands-on review

The smaller Pixel 7 feels like a notable downgrade at first, especially in terms of design and feel in hand, but acquits itself well in everyday use thanks to great performance and camera quality, both of which match its elder brother. It is also a fair bit cheaper, which makes up for some of the issues with the design.

Overall, the Pixel 7 phones may not seem all that exciting, especially if you already own a Pixel 6 device, but those upgrading from an older model or switching from another brand should find plenty to like on both.

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